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Parasites

  • Distemper in Dogs

    El moquillo es una enfermedad vírica altamente contagiosa que afecta a los perros domésticos. Otras especies como hurones, mapaches y mofetas también se ven afectadas por esta enfermedad.

  • Moxidectin and fluralaner are combined in one topical treatment for use in cats. Moxidectin topical is an avermectin antiparasitic that is used to prevent heartworms and treat intestinal parasites (hookworms and roundworms). Fluralaner is used to treat and prevent fleas and also kills black-legged ticks (deer ticks). Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include hair loss at the application site, itching, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, excessive drooling, and dry skin. Moxidectin + fluralaner should not be used in pets that are hypersensitive or allergic to it. Do not use this medication in sick, debilitated, or underweight cats. Use caution in cats with known neurologic disorders. If you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately. If they are not available, follow their directions in contacting an emergency facility.

  • Moxidectin is an avermectin antiparasitic that is used to prevent heartworms and treat intestinal parasites. Imidacloprid treats and prevents fleas. These two drugs are combined in one topical product for use in cats, dogs, and ferrets. Use as directed. Side effects are uncommon and usually short-lived, however, if you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately.

  • Moxidectin + sarolaner + pyrantel is a heartworm disease preventive for dogs that also treats and prevents internal parasites (hookworms and roundworms) and kills fleas and ticks. This medication is given by mouth as a flavored chew tablet. At regular doses, this medication is well-tolerated. Your veterinarian will advise you on the safety of moxidectin + sarolaner + pyrantel use in your dog. If you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately.

  • The American Animal Hospital Association and American Veterinary Medical Association have established guidelines to standardize preventive health care for cats, helping them to live longer, healthier lives. This handout provides an overview of the recommendations within these guidelines and why they are so important.

  • The American Animal Hospital Association and American Veterinary Medical Association have established guidelines to standardize preventive health care for dogs, helping them to live longer, healthier lives. This handout provides an overview of the recommendations within these guidelines and why they are so important.

  • Pythiosis is a waterborne infection that can infect the GI tract or skin of dogs. It can cause extreme weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea or skin lesions such as ulcerating nodules and draining tracts. This disease is more common in southern regions. Treatment involves surgical removal of all affected material if possible, including limb amputation if indicated. Different antifungal therapies have shown some efficacy and need to be continued long-term. Prognosis for resolution of pythiosis is guarded to poor.

  • Adding a new kitten to your family is a lot of fun, but it is also a big responsibility. This handout reviews basic kitten care, including vaccinations, internal and external parasites, nutrition, and nail care. It also reviews the importance of early spay/neuter and microchip identification.

  • Owning a puppy can be an extremely rewarding experience but it is also a large responsibility that lasts the entire lifetime of the dog. Working with your veterinarian, there are several preventive measures to help keep your puppy safe and healthy as he grows up, including vaccination, parasite treatment and prevention, identification, and spaying or neutering your dog.

  • Ringworm infections in cats are caused by a fungus, not a worm. They can be easily recognized, though definitive testing by fungal culture is recommended. Ringworm is highly contagious and can be spread between animals and from animals to people. The clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and risks are explained in this handout.